The London Tourist’s Bucketlist – 50 London Attractions You Have To See


London’s 50 Most Iconic Buildings; Locations & Attractions

 

  1. St. James’s Palace. Built by King Henry VIII on the site of a leper hospital dedicated to Saint James the Less, the palace was secondary in importance to the Palace of Whitehall for most Tudor and Stuart monarchs. St James’s Palace is the most senior royal palace in the United Kingdom. Located in the City of Westminster, although no longer the principal residence of the monarch, it is the ceremonial meeting place of the Accession Council and the London residence of several members of the royal family.St. James's Palace
  2. Buckingham Palace. Originally known as Buckingham House, the building at the core of today’s palace was a large townhouse built for the Duke of Buckingham in 1703 on a site that had been in private ownership for at least 150 years. It was acquired by King George III in 1761 as a private residence for Queen Charlotte and became known as The Queen’s House. During the 19th century it was enlarged with three wings around a central courtyard. Buckingham Palace became the London residence of the British monarch on the accession of Queen Victoria in 1837.Buckingham Palace
  3. The Houses of Parliament/Palace of WestminsterThe Houses of Parliament
  4. 10 Downing Street10 Downing Street
  5. Soho
  6. Covent Garden

    Covent Garden

    Covent Garden

  7. Hyde Park

    Hyde Park

    Hyde Park

  8. Knightsbridge

    Knightsbridge

    WW1 victory parade, Knightsbridge, London, 1919.

  9. West End

    West End

    West End

  10. Royal Opera HouseRoyal Opera House
  11. Speakers’ Corner

    Speakers' Corner

    Speakers’ Corner

  12. Hyde Park Corner/Wellington Arch

    Wellington Arch

    Wellington Arch

  13. Madame TussaudsMadame Tussauds
  14. Fortnum & MasonFortnum & Mason
  15. Abbey Road StudiosAbbey Road Studios
  16. Lord’s Cricket GroundLords Cricket Ground
  17. Carnaby Street

    Carnaby Street

    Carnaby Street

  18. Piccadilly CircusPiccadilly Circus
  19. Trafalgar SquareTrafalgar Square
  20. Nelson’s ColumnNelson's Column
  21. Royal Courts of Justice

    Royal Courts of Justice

    Royal Courts of Justice

  22. Cleopatra’s Needle

    Cleopatra's Needle

    Cleopatra’s Needle

  23. Big BenBig Ben
  24. Westminster AbbeyWestminster Abbey
  25. Churchill War Rooms. In 1936 the Air Ministry believed that in the event of war enemy aerial bombing of London would cause up to 200,000 casualties per week. British government commissions in 1937 and 1938 considered that key government offices should be dispersed from central London to the suburbs, and non-essential offices to the Midlands or North West. Pending this dispersal, in May 1938 Sir Hastings Ismay, then Deputy Secretary of the Committee of Imperial Defence, ordered an Office of Works survey of Whitehall to find a suitable site for a temporary emergency government centre. The Office concluded the most suitable site was the basement of the New Public Offices, a government building located on the corner of Horse Guards Road and Great George Street, near Parliament Square.Work to convert the basement of the New Public Offices began in June 1938. The work included installing communications and broadcasting equipment, sound-proofing, ventilation and reinforcement. A Central War Room would facilitate decision-making between the Chiefs of Staff of the armed forces.In May 1939 it was decided that the Cabinet would be housed within the Central War Room. With war imminent and government facilities in the suburbs not yet ready, the War Rooms became operational on 27 August 1939, days before the invasion of Poland on 1 September, and Britain’s declaration of war on Germany on 3 September.

    Churchill War Rooms

    Churchill War Rooms

  26. Tower BridgeTower Bridge
  27. Wembley Stadium. The stadium contains 2,618 toilets, more than any other venue in the world. The initial plan for the reconstruction of Wembley was for demolition to begin before Christmas 2000, and for the new stadium to be completed some time during 2003, but this work was delayed by a succession of financial and legal difficulties. Demolition officially began on 30 September 2002, with the Twin Towers being dismantled in December 2002.Wembley Stadium
  28. Olympic Stadium. Construction of the stadium commenced in May 2008 after the bowl of the stadium had been dug out and the area cleared. On 11 February 2011, the Olympic Park Legacy Company (OPLC) unanimously selected West Ham United and Newham Council as the preferred bidders to take over the stadium after the 2012 Games. In April 2012, the Olympic Park Legacy Company was dismantled and responsibilities transferred to the newly constituted London Legacy Development Corporation (LLDC).

    Olympic Stadium

    Olympic Stadium

  29. All England Lawn Tennis and Croquet Club

    All England Lawn Tennis and Croquet Club

    All England Lawn Tennis and Croquet Club

  30. Twickenham Stadium

    Twickenham Stadium

    Twickenham Stadium

  31. Shakespeare’s Globe Theatre

    Shakespeare's Globe Theatre

    Shakespeare’s Globe Theatre

  32. Royal Albert Hall

    Royal Albert Hall

    Royal Albert Hall

  33. Old Bailey

    Old Bailey

    Old Bailey

  34. Scotland Yard

    Scotland Yard

    Scotland Yard

  35. British Museum

    British Museum

    British Museum

  36. Imperial War Museum

    Imperial War Museum

    Imperial War Museum

  37. Tower of London

    Tower of London

    Tower of London

  38. St Paul’s Cathedral

    St Paul's Cathedral

    St Paul’s Cathedral

  39. Harrods

    Harrods

    Harrods

  40. Kensington Palace

    Kensington Palace

    Kensington Palace

  41. Hampton Court Palace. Thomas Wolsey, Archbishop of York, Chief Minister and favourite of Henry VIII, took over the site of Hampton Court Palace in 1514. Wolsey was only to enjoy his palace for a few years. In 1528, knowing that his enemies and the King were engineering his downfall, he passed the palace to the King as a gift. Wolsey died two years later in 1530. A well-known curiosity of the palace’s grounds is Hampton Court Maze; planted in the 1690s by George London and Henry Wise for William III of Orange. 

    Hampton Court Palace

    Hampton Court Palace

  42. BT Tower

    BT Tower

    BT Tower

  43. Heron Tower

    Heron Tower

    Heron Tower

  44. The Shard

    The Shard

    The Shard

  45. London Eye

    London Eye at night

    London Eye at night

  46. Kew Gardens

    Kew Gardens

    Kew Gardens

  47. Richmond Park

    Richmond Park

    Richmond Park

  48. Clapham Common

    Clapham Common

    Clapham Common

  49. Hampstead Heath

    Hampstead Heath

    Hampstead Heath

  50. Wandsworth Common

    Wandsworth Common

    Wandsworth Common